Resurrecting an Old House and an Old Ministry

We are happy to announce that last week, we completed the work needed to make the Grayling house habitable for the winter. The yield of James’ long work days: the basement walls have a “bandaid” applied that will keep the cold and moisture out, the chimney for the woodstove in the basement has been repaired, a fuel tank and oil stove has been installed to provide heat to the house, the plumbing has been repaired, and a propane on-demand water heater has been installed. The night before we left, we all enjoyed hot showers and a warm comfortable house!

A lot of village life is making do with what is available. The work on the house is no different. Most of the work on the house was accomplished through materials that were on hand in the village. Lumber, plywood, insulation, plumbing supplies, spare chimney sections—most were already on site from past projects or otherwise collected over the years. When you go into a village, you might see a lot of broken down equipment or piles of old materials. This is not by accident. Often those old remains have valuable parts that will help in making something else function again. This is also true spiritually. Sometimes we get used to shiny, new churches and programs and look at the past as an old relic. It may be that the past can provide just the right part to make what we have function again. Please pray for us to have wisdom in sorting through the piles of past ministry to know how to recover what is useful.

Timothy's first flight in his own seat. (He wasn't unhappy as appears; picture was just snapped at a less than optimal moment.)

Timothy’s first flight in his own seat. (He wasn’t unhappy as appears; picture was just snapped at a less than optimal moment.)

Final approach, Grayling

Final approach, Grayling

Touchdown, Grayling. Yukon River on the right.

Touchdown, Grayling. Yukon River on the right.

A little ingenuity, and it is possible for two people to move a heavy, cumbersome 300-gallon fuel tank from around the house and up onto a stand. ("Give me a long enough lever, and I will move the world!")

A little ingenuity, and it is possible for two people to move a heavy, cumbersome 300-gallon fuel tank from around the house and up onto a stand. (“Give me a long enough lever, and I will move the world!”)

Ta-da!

Ta-da!

Fuel tank in place! The slanty wall is the "bandaid" to insulate the walls that have openings between the basement and outside.

Fuel tank in place! The slanty wall is the “bandaid” to insulate the walls that have openings between the basement and outside.

One of the gaps open to the basement

BEFORE: One of the gaps open to the basement

 

The Toyo stove is postitioned centrally in the house, in the dining room area in the kitchen. (Fuel tank is seen just outside the window.)

The Toyo stove is postitioned centrally in the house, in the dining room area in the kitchen. (Fuel tank is seen just outside the window.)

From Grayling, James flew over to Shageluk to help out on a search operation. Upon landing, he had to brake hard as this huge obstacle came lumbering along the air strip: one of the resident bison!

From Grayling, James flew over to Shageluk to help out on a search operation. Upon landing, he had to brake hard as this huge obstacle came lumbering along the air strip: one of the resident bison!

Denali and Mt Foraker peeking above the clouds at us, flying at 8,000 feet.

Denali and Mt Foraker peeking above the clouds at us, flying at 8,000 feet.

4 thoughts on “Resurrecting an Old House and an Old Ministry

  1. Dear Millers, Thanks for sending the update on the house, the plane, the quintet, warm house and everything in between. We enjoyed seeing the pictures. Looks like you are living it up, up there with a lot of hard work. I forwarded your letter to others in our church so they can enjoy it too.

    Prayer partners, melvina & bert

  2. Thank you for the updates so we can see and also know your prayer requests. We are also remodeling an apartment for our future pastor and family and have to reuse materials to keep us on a tight budget. Thank you for the fun, encouraging pictures and letters . Helps us realize that we are some of many that are working on furthering God’s Word. Nancy Paskenta Ca.

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